Sermons

Sermons

Sixth Sunday After Pentecost

At the beginning of the year I made a pilgrimage to Taize, France. Thousands of pilgrims from throughout the world travel to this village as guest of the Brothers of Taize, an ecumenical monastic community that found its origins during World War II. The Brothers’ hospitality they practiced then, housing refugees during the war, continues to today. With a particular focus on young people, Taize welcomes openly individuals to a time of spiritual renewal through bible study, prayer, song, and intentional community…

Fifth Sunday After Pentecost

Today’s gospel started with Jesus’ frustration about the negative response to his teaching. He mentioned that, historically-speaking, some had problems with John the Baptist because he was too demanding. On the other hand, some were frustrated that Jesus was too welcoming. Jesus identified the human truth that sometimes nothing will make us happy. On a simplistic level, we experience it on a hot summer day, when we long for snow; but, in the middle of February, we, then, wish for the hot sun. And this discontentment permeates our lives. During the pandemic, we were frustrated being locked down, and we are equally unhappy when we can emerge but now it’s with a mask. Then, in responding to racial inequality, taking a knee was wrong, and peaceful protesting was wrong, and disruptive protesting was wrong too. Sometimes, we, as humans, are never happy no matter the situation. And, frequently, these disgruntled responses come from our discomfort. Our discomfort in wearing a mask, our awkwardness in responding to racism and oppression, and, in today’s reading, our unease with the true essence of our God…

Reconciling in Christ Sunday

In 2006, our congregational council adopted a statement of welcome, explicitly naming the welcome of “people of all sexual orientations and gender identities.” Three years later, in 2009, our denomination voted to allow LGBTQ+ folx to become ordained—a vote that gave me the privilege to be in this space today, as your vicar. Without this vote, I, a queer woman, would not be allowed to be publicly “out” while also serving as a Minister of the church’s most precious gifts of Word and Sacrament. Five years ago, our country passed legislation that allowed for marriage equality. We have, as a country and as Church, …made great strides towards the inclusion of the queer community…